Augsburg/Anglican Book Store Merger Almost Complete

The merger of Augsburg Fortress and the Anglican Book Centre (ABC) is almost complete, with only a few legal and technical details remaining.

Augsburg Fortress Canada is a non-profit ministry providing resources to the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada (ELCIC); the Anglican Book Centre is a similar ministry serving the Anglican Church of Canada (ACC).

This week, the new Augsburg/ABC entity is strongly represented at the ACC’s General Synod and the ELCIC National Convention; both gatherings are taking place in Winnipeg.

Several months ago when the Anglican Church of Canada announced a new structure for the ABC that included the closing of its Toronto bookstore. Augsburg Fortress approached the Anglican Church to talk about a joint ministry venture. Highlighting the similarities in each organization’s mandate, formal talks began, and as of June 1, Augsburg Fortress assumed management of the ABC operations.

As evidence of commonality between the ACC and ELCIC in the Waterloo Declaration, the partnership between Augsburg Fortress and ABC will now represent one ministry serving both churches.

By providing the best of Anglican and Lutheran resources through a consolidated national order desk, two bookstore locations (Augsburg is located in Kitchener), and a presence at major church events from coast-to-coast, this new partnership will mean sustainability in addition to the quality products and services that congregations have come to expect.

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The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada is Canada’s largest Lutheran denomination with 174,555 baptized members in 620 congregations. It is a member of the Lutheran World Federation, the Canadian Council of Churches and the World Council of Churches.

Material provided through ELCIC Information is intended for reproduction and redistribution by recipients in whatever manner they may find useful.

For more information, please contact:
Trina Gallop, Manager of Communications
302-393 Portage Ave. Winnipeg MB R3B 3H6
204.984.9172
tgallop@elcic.ca

Subscribe or unsubscribe to ELCIC Information by emailing info@elcic.ca with a short message.

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Final Preparations for the ELCIC’s National Convention Under Way at University Campus

As Lutherans from across Canada prepare to meet in Winnipeg for the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada (ELCIC)’s Eleventh Biennial National Convention, final preparations were under way at the Fort Garry Campus of the University of Manitoba, the location where delegates will gather for convention. Almost 400 delegates and special guests, 100 visitors, and 200 volunteers are expected to be part of the convention’s business meetings and worship services, which will officially start on Thursday, June 21 and conclude on Sunday, June 24.

Even before the National Convention registration desk opened on Wednesday at 4:00 p.m. at the University of Manitoba’s University Centre, a flurry of activity was seen on campus throughout the day. Aside from ELCIC and university staff who were busy with set-up and last minute preparations, the campus, which is usually quiet at this time of the year, saw the influx of delegates arriving to check into their dorm rooms.

Adding to the on-campus activity, National Church Council members met Wednesday to review final arrangements and deal with matters pertaining to National Convention.

Prior to the start of the ELCIC National Convention, which will officially begin at 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, delegates will join members of the Anglican Church of Canada (ACC)’s General Synod on Thursday to spend the day together. Those not in attendance at the Joint Day can view the entire day’s proceedings through a video webcast which will be available for access through the ELCIC and ACC websites. The location on the ELCIC website where the link will be posted is: https://elcic.ca/In-Convention/2007-Winnipeg/default.cfm

June 21, the day of the Joint ELCIC/ACC gathering, is also significant in that it is National Aboriginal Day. Representatives from about 10 Canadian churches and church-affiliated organizations will gather at the same venue as the delegates and members from the ELCIC and ACC, the Winnipeg Convention Centre, to renew a landmark covenant with Indigenous peoples that pledges the churches to continue working on human rights and justice issues for native peoples. A ceremony will mark the 20th anniversary of the signing in 1987 of the document entitled A New Covenant: Towards the Constitutional Recognition and Protection of Aboriginal Self-Government in Canada. Following the ceremony, a news conference and the release of a commemorative poster and a statement calling on all Christians to work ecumenically and collaboratively with Aboriginal peoples will take place.

In addition to the Anglican and Lutheran churches, representatives at the recommitment ceremony are expected from the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops, the Canadian Council of Churches, the Christian Reformed Church in North America, KAIROS (an ecumenical group working on justice initiatives), the Mennonite Central Committee Canada, the Mennonite Church Canada, the Presbyterian Church in Canada and the United Church of Canada.

Information and highlights from the ELCIC’s Eleventh National Convention will be posted on the ELCIC’s website: www.elcic.ca

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NOTE FOR MEDIA REPRESENTATIVES: Media are invited to attend the ELCIC’s Eleventh Biennial National Convention and/or the recommitment ceremony and news conference. All media must registered, forms for accreditation can be found at the following link: https://elcic.ca/In-Convention/2007-Winnipeg/Media-Information.cfm

The recommitment ceremony will be held Thursday, June 21 at 3 p.m. at the Winnipeg Convention Centre, 375 York Blvd., in Hall A on the 3rd floor. The news conference will follow at 4 p.m. in the VIP Ballroom on the same level.

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The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada is Canada’s largest Lutheran denomination with 174,555 baptized members in 620 congregations. It is a member of the Lutheran World Federation, the Canadian Council of Churches and the World Council of Churches.

Material provided through ELCIC Information is intended for reproduction and redistribution by recipients in whatever manner they may find useful.

For more information, please contact:
Trina Gallop, Manager of Communications
302-393 Portage Ave. Winnipeg MB R3B 3H6
204.984.9172
tgallop@elcic.ca

Subscribe or unsubscribe to ELCIC Information by emailing info@elcic.ca with a short message.

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Lutherans Prayerfully Prepare for Eleventh Biennial National Convention

Almost 400 delegates from across Canada will gather in Winnipeg this week to participate in the Eleventh Biennial National Convention of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada (ELCIC). During the two and a half days of convention business meetings, delegates will elect a new National Bishop, celebrate the Evangelical Declaration – one of the theological foundations of the ELCIC, discuss a motion on synodical oversight regarding the blessing of same-sex relationships, and embark on a Stewardship of Creation Initiative – an environmental action plan for the ELCIC.

The National Convention takes place every two years and includes clergy, lay, staff members, international partners and guests. In addition to delegates and special guests, over one hundred visitors are registered to attend and over two hundred volunteers will assist with convention logistics.

Delegates to the ELCIC National Convention will first gather at the Winnipeg Convention Centre on Thursday, June 21, alongside delegates from the Anglican Church of Canada (ACC) General Synod. Almost 1000 individuals from both denominations will participate in the joint day festivities, which include a celebration of six years of full communion between the two churches. Structured as a Eucharistic service, the day will include a featured speaker, joyful music and time for reflection and conversation.

The business session of the National Convention will commence on Thursday evening at 7:00 p.m. at the University of Manitoba Fort Garry campus. The first item of business for the convention agenda is the election of the National Bishop. In January, National Bishop Raymond L. Schultz, who will chair the convention, announced his retirement effective September 1, 2007. While the first and second ballots for bishop are scheduled to take place on Thursday night, it is possible that a bishop will not be elected until Friday night as the process within the ELCIC for the election of a bishop provides for up to six ballots. Further information on the ELCIC National Bishop election process is available at the following link: https://elcic.ca/In-Convention/2007-Winnipeg/documents/HowaBishopisChosen.pdf

Friday, June 22 and Saturday, June 23 will be full days of business proceedings for the convention delegates. On Friday, convention delegates will celebrate the 10th Anniversary of the Evangelical Declaration, a document that defines, "what it means for us to be the church and what it means to live as the church in the world" notes Bishop Schultz. At the convention, delegates will vote on a motion to adopt an updated version of the declaration titled, In Mission for Others: An Evangelical Theology of Mission.

Friday’s business session will also include the introduction of the ELCIC’s Stewardship of Creation Initiative, a church-wide commitment to caring for the environment.

Leading up to convention, delegates have been prayerfully considering a motion on same-sex blessings, which is part of Saturday’s agenda. The ELCIC’s National Church Council (NCC) has recommended a motion recognizing the diversity of Canadian culture and the varied ministry required to be a church In Mission for Others. Convention delegates will determine whether to recommend that ELCIC synods be encouraged, “to develop ways to best minister to people who live in committed same-sex relationships, including the possibility of blessing such unions.”

Throughout the business agenda of convention, delegates will also deal with proposed constitutional amendments, approval of the ELCIC financial statements, and the election of several NCC members. Convention delegates will also received greetings from ELCIC guests and partner representatives, including The Rev. Dr. Karen Hamilton, General Secretary of The Canadian Council of Churches (CCC), The Rev. Norbert Denecke from the United Evangelical Lutheran Church in Germany (VELKD), and Mr. Carlos Pena, Vice President of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA).

National Conventions of the ELCIC are the highest legislative body of the church and are held every two years (biennially). The voting membership of convention consists of two hundred ordained ministers elected by the conferences as allocated by NCC on the basis of baptized members; and a lay delegate elected by each parish not already represented by an ordained minister. In addition, a lay delegate may be elected by parishes with greater than eight hundred baptized members.

Further information on the Eleventh Biennial Convention of the ELCIC is available online: https://elcic.ca/In-Convention/2007-Winnipeg

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NOTE FOR MEDIA REPRESENTATIVES: All media must to be accredited in order to attend this event. Forms for accreditation can be found at the following link: https://elcic.ca/In-Convention/2007-Winnipeg/Media-Information.cfm

—————————————————————–
The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada is Canada’s largest Lutheran denomination with 174,555 baptized members in 620 congregations. It is a member of the Lutheran World Federation, the Canadian Council of Churches and the World Council of Churches.

Material provided through ELCIC Information is intended for reproduction and redistribution by recipients in whatever manner they may find useful.

For more information, please contact:
Trina Gallop, Manager of Communications
302-393 Portage Ave. Winnipeg MB R3B 3H6
204.984.9172
tgallop@elcic.ca

Subscribe or unsubscribe to ELCIC Information by emailing info@elcic.ca with a short message.

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Global Religious Leaders Call On G8 To Honour Commitments to Millennium Development Goals

Just prior to the recent meeting of the G8 in Heiligendamm, Germany, a parallel summit of religious leaders from around the world, including The Rev. Dr. Karen Hamilton, General Secretary of The Canadian Council of Churches, met and issued a statement calling on G8 leaders to honour their commitments to the Millennium Development Goals and debt cancellation. For the first time, leaders from continents around the world, not just Europe, were invited; participation included a broad spectrum of faith traditions.
  
Over 50 religious leaders gathered at the pre-G8 meeting, including Archbishop Desmond Tutu and other African leaders. The following is the statement delivered to the G8 by the religious leaders. As a follow-up to the statement, leaders committed to being prayerfully present at the 2008 G8 meeting which is to be held in Japan.
 
Just Participation: A Call from Cologne
Statement of the Cologne Religious Leaders Summit, Cologne, 6 June 2007
Convened here in Cologne in a Conference of Religious Leaders, meeting on the eve of the G8 Summit, which will take place in the Baltic resort of Heiligendamm, Germany, we speak as Christian, Muslim, Jewish, Buddhist, Hindu, Shinto and indigenous Religious Leaders from religious communities of the G8 countries, from Africa and international religious bodies to the G8 Heads of State and to those who struggle for worldwide poverty eradication. In so doing, the Conference developed many of the themes previously discussed by religious initiatives at the time of the British G8 in 2005 and the World Summit of Religious Leaders at the time of the Russian G8 in 2006.
Common to all our traditions is the belief that human dignity and justice are gifts from God. The Jewish faith focuses on the protection of the poor, weak, foreigners, widows and orphans. Central to the Christian belief is Christ´s presence alongside every single poor, marginalised and oppressed person. Within the Islamic tradition the equality of all human beings and the spread of justice are major ethical principles. In the Hindu tradition, the concept of Sewa – service to others without seeking reward – is seen as one´s duty in life. The Buddhist ethical philosophy embraces the interconnectedness of all being entities which leads to love and compassion. Shinto belief sees humans as children of the kami (God) and owing their life to God and their ancestors.
This common belief challenges us to break the chains of poverty. Our religious communities do so by strengthening the values of solidarity and social coherence in our societies, by providing education, health care and social and other welfare services and by speaking out on behalf of the poor and marginalized. We remain concerned that justice and dignity are not a reality in the lives of so many of our sisters and brothers. We acknowledge that religions still have to develop a broader co-operation for the welfare of all. But, we call on the G8 Heads of State and Government to create structures of participation and empowerment that provide for people to make choices for their well-being and the well-being of others.
The Millennium Development Goals are Achievable
As in 2005 and 2006 we remain alarmed about the slow and uneven progress made towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). 2007 now marks the half way point in the MDG process. The degree of extreme poverty in our word is a scandal. The crisis of poverty, including that in the countries of the G8, is not abstract. It involves real human suffering and it remains the most severe in the Sub-Sahara, where despite some successes, such as improved primary school enrolment, the majority of countries are not on track to achieving the goals. Increased migration flows from Africa to the G8 and the G8s inability to develop coherent and ethical responses to this issue is itself indicative of the global economic imbalances between rich and poor. Yet, by adopting the MDGs in 2000, Heads of State and Government recognised that in addition to their separate responsibilities to their own individual societies, they had a collective responsibility to uphold the principles of human dignity, justice and equity at the global level and declared poverty alleviation as an overarching goal of international co-operation.
We welcome the steps taken by the current Presidency of the G8 to encourage the better integration of Southern economies into the system of democratic global governance. However, we remain concerned that under the motto “Growth and Responsibility’, the G8 Presidency has prioritized expanding market-driven mechanisms, but it has put much less emphasis on the G8’s responsibility for pursuing clear and coherent poverty eradication programmes with a focus on human development.
1. Rethinking a controversial economic model: The G8 still appears to pursue an economic model that prioritizes economic growth regardless of its social and economic impact, a reality which has led, even in their own countries, to a widening gap between rich and poor. The G8 has, so far, failed to develop binding frameworks for monitoring the social and ecological accountability of private corporations. The “Guidelines of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) for Multinational Enterprises”, of which all G8 countries, except Russia, are members, need to be endowed with effective mechanisms. A dimension of ethical responsibility and a convincing development agenda has to be included into the “Economic Partnership Agreements” of the European Union with the former African, Caribbean and Pacific states.
2. Strengthening Africa’s position in international relations: We welcome the fact that the G8 has committed itself to supporting the African reform process in the spirit of NEPAD (the New Partnership for Africa’s Development) by intensifying its support for good governance, improved financial management and enhanced transparency. But at the same time, we are aware of the weak position Africa has in international institutions like the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, whose regulations impede an appropriate participation of the African countries in decision-making processes even though their policies and programmes impact on the social development of African countries. This has often hindered progress towards the MDGs. We propose the creation of a permanent forum involving the G8 and Africa based on mutual respect and understanding.
3. Enhancing peace and security: The Millennium Development Goals cannot be achieved without peace and security. The G8 needs to support the African Union in building African security structures capable of resolving endemic conflicts, as in Darfur. This support must not be compromised by the G8´s export of arms to countries affected by violent conflict or by its ownintensive military spending programmes. We are concerned at the deteriorating relationships between G8 members regarding the question of ballistic missile defence and the perceived fear that such a system might contribute to an arms race.
4. Honouring Past G8 Promises for Poverty Eradication: In 2005, the G8 promised to increase aid by $50 billion annually by 2010, with half of this increase going to Africa. It further agreed to cancel the debts owed by the world’s poorest countries to the World Bank, the IMF and the African Development Fund. The G8 of 2005 also recommitted itself to concluding the development-friendly ‘Doha’ round of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) so that poor nations would benefit from the global economy. These promises represented substantial commitments for poverty eradication. The G8’s record on delivering on these promises has, to date, been very disappointing.
          Official Development Aid shows significant increases on the 2005 levels but all too often these figures include large debt cancellations, most notably that for Iraq and Nigeria. G8 governments must stop double-counting debt cancellation as part of their aid budget and set firm timetables for delivering on their promise of increasing aid, mainly for the Least Developed Countries. The German Presidency’s decision to persuade other G8 partners to contribute their share to the work of the Global Fund for combating HIV/Aids, tuberculosis and malaria is welcomed. Equally urgent is strong investment in the research and development of medications against Malaria and other tropical diseases, which primarily affects populations in countries of the global south.
          Debt Cancellation has enabled a number of countries to make important investments in health care and education. Yet, the ‘Enhanced Heavily Indebted Countries Initiative’ and the ‘Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative’ have proved incapable of addressing the full extent of the debt problem. These mechanisms have often created new problems with some eligible countries having to adhere to stringent policy conditions. The illegitimacy of certain debts has so far not been recognized.
          International Trade remains problematic. The indefinite suspension of the ‘Development-Round’ of the WTO has meant that many African countries have been deprived of an important driver of economic and social change. The inability to overcome trade deadlocks illustrates the persistence of structural economic imbalances between rich and poor countries. The rich countries are still unwilling to adopt policies which are good for small-scale agriculture in the global south, which then suffers heavily under unfair competition against highly subsidized agriculture in the northern countries.
5. Towards a new international framework on Climate Change. Climate change is a reality for many poor people living in areas where the weather is presently variable and/or in communities highly vulnerable to minor changes to the weather, minor changes which can have devastating effects. We warmly welcome and support the German Presidency’s decision to use the Heiligendamm Summit to generate an impulse for a world-wide protection agreement, to take effect after 2012. At present there remains a significant deficit of political will, a miasma of national interests and a real concern on the part of poorer and developing nations that they will have to give up the prospect of economic growth if they commit themselves to any restraints on CO2 emissions. For an international climate agreement to be workable it must have at its heart development-friendly mechanisms by which the developed countries fund clean development activities in less developed countries.
To the Future
Given all of these realities, given the Divine Imperative which calls all of us, all peoples and the whole inhabited world, to systems, structures and relationships of justice, equity, respect and human dignity, we stand together at this Religious Leaders’ Summit and call on the G8 Heads of State and Government and all peoples of good will, to work with us, with renewed vigour, commitment and creativity, towards the fulfilment of the MDGs and the promises of the 2005 G8. We call for concrete, discernible, life-giving and life-sustaining progresses in the lives of our sisters and brothers and our planet. We both call for and pledge ourselves to the future of life, now. We commit ourselves to meeting again in Japan in 2008.
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The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada is Canada’s largest Lutheran denomination with 174,555 baptized members in 620 congregations. It is a member of the Lutheran World Federation, the Canadian Council of Churches and the World Council of Churches.
Material provided through ELCIC Information is intended for reproduction and redistribution by recipients in whatever manner they may find useful.
For more information, please contact:
Trina Gallop, Manager of Communications
302-393 Portage Ave. Winnipeg MB R3B 3H6
204.984.9172
tgallop@elcic.ca
Subscribe or unsubscribe to ELCIC Information by emailing info@elcic.ca with a short message.
 

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Online Resources for ELCIC National Convention

As the ELCIC prepares for the 11th Biennial National Convention taking place in Winnipeg, Manitoba from June 21 to 24, 2007 – the following are just a few of the new items that are being added to the ELCIC website.

National Bishop’s Sermon for Congregational Use on June 24 – National Bishop Raymond Schultz has written a sermon that can be used on Sunday, June 24, 2007. As many clergy will be attending worship that morning at the National Convention in Winnipeg, congregational leaders are encouraged to use this sermon in their pulpits that day. This sermon can be found at the following link in a pdf format: https://elcic.ca/In-Convention/2007-Winnipeg/Highlights.cfm (Please note that this sermon is not for further publication or public distribution prior to June 24.)

From the Waters of Creation Now Available Online – The winning entry from the Joint Anglican Lutheran Commission’s Hymn Text competition is available online from June to October 1. Author Keri Wehlander has provided permission for congregations to use this piece during this period and posted her hymn on her website: http://www.creativeworship.ca/

General Convention 2007 Information – Information and highlights on the 11th Biennial Convention are available online at https://www.elcic.ca/convention/2007 – this section of the ELCIC website will continue to be updated throughout convention.

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“From the Waters of Creation” Now Available Online

The winning entry from the Joint Anglican Lutheran Commission’s Hymn Text competition is available online from June to October 1. Author Keri Wehlander has provided permission for congregational use during this period and posted her hymn on her website: www.creativeworship.ca

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Communique from the Anglican-Lutheran International Commission

 The Third Anglican-Lutheran International Commission (ALIC) held its second meeting at White Point, Nova Scotia, Canada between May 14 and 20, 2007, under the chairmanship of the Rt Revd Fred Hiltz, Anglican Bishop of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, and the Revd Dr Thomas Nyiwe, President of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Cameroon.

The Commission has been established by the Anglican Consultative Council and the Lutheran World Federation (LWF) to continue the dialogue between Anglicans and Lutherans on the worldwide level which has been in progress since 1970. ALIC intends to build upon the work reflected in The Niagara Report (1987), focusing on the mission of the church and the role of the ordained ministry, The Diaconate as an Ecumenical Opportunity (1995), and most recently Growth in Communion (2002), the report of the Anglican – Lutheran International Working Group (ALIWG), which reviewed the extensive regional agreements which have established close relations between Anglican and Lutheran churches in several parts of the world.

The Commission first met in 2006 in Moshi, Tanzania where it set up working groups. At the White Point meeting the working groups continued their work and presented papers on a variety of topics, including the following: the status of Lutheran-Anglican relations in various regions of the world, the state of the question regarding the historic episcopate, emerging opportunities for joint mission and diaconal ministry, the state of interchangeability of ministries throughout the world, cooperation in theological education, a critical analysis of ecclesiology and the language of unity. The Commission also explored ways of developing these themes in its future work.

The Commission welcomed the LWF’s recent Lund statement on "Episcopal Ministry within the Apostolicity of the Church". It views this statement as a useful reference point for its own ongoing discussions on the ministry of episkopé, and commends it for study in the context of Anglican – Lutheran dialogue.

The Commission also had extensive discussions on the proposed draft for "An Anglican Covenant" and offered a response from the perspective of the document’s potential impact on ecumenical relations between the two communions. This response has been forwarded to the Covenant Design Group. The Commission encourages the Lutheran World Federation to respond to the Covenant draft.

As a result of its deliberations on the ministry of diakonia, the Commission plans to include in its future meetings a block of time devoted to strategies that will help our churches work more closely together in common witness to address issues such as HIV-AIDS and poverty.

The Commission took action to enable the All Africa Anglican – Lutheran Commission (AAALC) to move ahead with its mandate, and anticipates a report from the AAALC at its next meeting.

The meeting was hosted by the Anglican Communion in cooperation with Bishop Fred Hiltz. The Commission was welcomed by Bishop Raymond Schultz, National Bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, and received a greeting from the Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, Archbishop Andrew Hutchison. Commission members visited The Little Dutch Church, the oldest standing building of Lutheran origin in Canada and now associated with the Anglican parish of St. George in Halifax, as well as the Cathedral Church of All Saints of Halifax, and historic St. John’s Church in Lunenburg, the centrepiece of the World Historic District of Old Town Lunenburg.

The Commission is planning to meet next year (2008) in Norway. We give thanks to God for the vocation of Anglicans and Lutherans to bear witness to the love of God revealed in Christ in their common service to the world, and we pray that God will bless and guide the life of both Communions in this work.

The members of the Commission are:

Anglicans:

    • The Rt Revd Fred Hiltz, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada (Co-Chair)
    • The Revd Dr Charlotte Methuen, Hanau, Germany and Oxford, England
    • The Rt Revd Musonda T S Mwamba, Gaborone, Botswana
    • The Revd Professor Renta Nishihara, Tokyo, Japan
    • The Very Revd William H Petersen, Columbus, Ohio, USA
    • Revd Dr Cathy Thomson, Brisbane, Australia

Consultants:

    • The Revd Canon Dr Alyson Barnett-Cowan, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    • The Revd Dr Günther Esser, the Old Catholic Churches of the Union of Utrecht (unable to attend)

Co-Secretary:

    • The Revd Canon Dr Gregory Cameron, Anglican Communion Office, London, England

Lutherans:

    • Revd Dr Thomas Nyiwe, Ngaoundere-Adamaoua, Cameroon (Co-Chair)
    • Professor Dr Kirsten Busch Nielsen, Copenhagen, Denmark
    • Revd Angel Furlan, Buenos Aires, Argentina
    • Revd Dr Cameron R Harder, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
    • Landesbischof Jürgen Johannesdotter, Germany (unable to attend)
    • Revd Helene Tärneberg Steed, Cork, Republic of Ireland

Consultants:

    • Professor Dr Kenneth G Appold, Strasbourg, France (Acting Co-Secretary)
    • Rt Revd Dr Ndanganeni P Phaswana, Soweto, South Africa

Administrative support was provided by the Revd Terrie Robinson of the Anglican Communion Office.

For more information, please contact:
Ms.Trina Gallop, Manager of Communications
302 – 393 Portage Ave. Winnipeg MB R3B 3H6
204.984.9172
tgallop@elcic.ca

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ELCIC Participates in Ceremony to Reaffirm Aboriginal-Church Covenant

The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada (ELCIC), along with representatives of eight other Canadian church denominations reaffirmed a covenant recognizing the rights of the nation’s Aboriginal peoples during a ceremony which took place following a full day of worship and conversation between delegates and members of the ELCIC’s National Convention and the Anglican Church of Canada (ACC)’s General Synod.

Titled, Towards the Constitutional Recognition and Protection of Aboriginal Self-Government in Canada, the covenant reaffirmed a previous statement by the leaders of Canadian Christian Churches on Aboriginal Rights and the Canadian Constitution which was signed 20 years ago on February 5, 1987.
 
During the ceremony church leaders repeated a pledge committing to “the vision of a new relationship between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples based on sharing, respect and the recognition of rights and responsibilities.”
 
The rededication ceremony occurred during a joint all-day liturgy service held by the ELCIC and ACC. Both churches are holding their national conventions in Winnipeg this week. The ceremony also coincided with National Aboriginal Day.
 
The 1987 covenant marked a major step forward in reconciliation between Canada’s Aboriginal peoples and the church, and recognizes Aboriginals’ rights to be distinct peoples, to an adequate land base and to self-determination.
 
Following the ceremony, at news conference held by KAIROS: Canadian Ecumenical Justice Initiatives, leaders praised the rededication. “This is a spiritually significant event,” said The Rt. Rev. Mark MacDonald, the first-ever national indigenous Anglican Bishop, noting that the ceremony took place on the first day of the summer solstice.
 
Representatives at the news conference expressed confidence that covenants, such as the one with the churches, will help in making constitutional advances for Aboriginal people.
 
“It gives us hope and keeps our faith alive that some day we will succeed,” said Clement Chartier, president of the Metis National Council. “Our people are a spiritual people, by and large. We believe it’s important to work with the churches and move forward.”
 
ELCIC National Bishop Raymond Schulz said his church urges an early resolution to native land claims, many of which have dragged on for years.
 
Archbishop Andrew Hutchison, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, said progress has been made since the 1987 covenant was issued. The Anglican Church has formally apologized for its role in residential schools and reached a financial agreement on compensation to those affected.
 
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The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada is Canada’s largest Lutheran denomination with 174,555 baptized members in 620 congregations. It is a member of the Lutheran World Federation, the Canadian Council of Churches and the World Council of Churches.

Material provided through ELCIC Information is intended for reproduction and redistribution by recipients in whatever manner they may find useful.

For more information, please contact:
Trina Gallop, Manager of Communications
302-393 Portage Ave. Winnipeg MB R3B 3H6
204.984.9172
tgallop@elcic.ca

Subscribe or unsubscribe to ELCIC Information by emailing info@elcic.ca with a short message.

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Hymn Competition Winner Announced

Keri Wehlander of Nanaimo, British Columbia has been named the winner of the Hymn Text Competition. Wehlander’s submission, "From the Waters of Creation", set to the tune of Nettleton, was selected by the Joint Anglican Lutheran Commission (JALC) following the review of almost one hundred submissions. The competition was created to develop a new tune, familiar to both the traditions of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada (ELCIC) and the Anglican Church of Canada (ACC) who will be gathering for a joint day together while in Winnipeg in June for their respective National Convention and General Synod meetings.

Upon announcement of the winning submission, the JALC issued the following:

Keri Wehlander of Nanaimo, British Columbia, has written, "From the Waters of Creation", set to the tune Nettleton. "One of the strengths of the hymn," writes the Rev’d Dr Richard Leggett, one of the members of the Joint Commission charged with selecting the winner, "is its evocation of the many saving acts of God associated with water and God’s continuing work among us. I particularly appreciate the recurrent phrase that God’s grace continues to flow in the world. "

"From the Waters of Creation" will be sung at the joint gathering of the Anglican Church of Canada General Synod and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada National Convention on June 21 in Winnipeg.

Deep thanks go out to all who made submissions. "We received entries from across the country, from men and women, clergy and laity, young and old. The quality was high. I was particularly struck by the Canadian character of the imagery throughout the hymns," commented Eileen Scully, the General Synod staff person who served the Joint Commission’s project.

For further information, please contact:

Trina Gallop
Manager of Communications, ELCIC
(204) 984-9172 

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Convention Notes: ELCIC and ACC Joint Day on June 21, 2007

 

 

In less than two months, delegates representing the parishes of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada (ELCIC) will gather in Winnipeg, Manitoba for the 11th Biennial National Convention of the ELCIC. Over the next few weeks CONVENTION NOTES will share information and highlights on the upcoming gathering.

For more information, please contact:

Ms.Trina Gallop

, Manager of Communications
302 – 393 Portage Ave. Winnipeg MB R3B 3H6
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The second article in this series is on the ELCIC and Anglican Church of Canada (ACC) joint day which will take place on June 21, 2007. This article is written by the Rev. Paul Johnson, Assistant to the Bishop for Ecumenical Relations. Further information, including specific information for delegates, is available on the ELCIC website at www. elcic.ca (click on the link to 2007 National Convention).

Joint Day, ELCIC and ACC – June 2007

On a beautiful Sunday morning in July of 2001, in the arena at Kitchener-Waterloo, members of the Anglican Church of Canada (ACC) General Synod and delegates to the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada (ELCIC) National Convention, along with many local members and friends, came together to celebrate the Full Communion relationship between our two churches. There was great jubilation in the congregation, and at the end of the morning, during the recessional music, the Primate of the ACC, Michael Peers, and the National Bishop of the ELCIC, Telmor Sartison, were dancing in the sheer joy of the moment.

Six years have passed. In many ways our two churches are closer than ever. In other ways we realize that there are many differences yet. But, most importantly, we continue to celebrate the Eucharist together, in the full communion which is Our Lord’s desire for all Christians, and we work together in many and various ways, including the full exchange of clergy. There have been and remain numerous instances of ELCIC pastors serving Anglican congregations and ministries, and ACC priests serving ELCIC congregations and ministries, as together we seek to make the best use of the gifted people which God has given us.

On a Thursday morning in Manitoba, the longest day of the year, and National Aboriginal Day, also known as 21 June 2007, our two churches will meet once again, as both bodies hold their national assemblies in Winnipeg. We will spend the day together at the Winnipeg Convention Centre, from nine in the morning until four in the afternoon, celebrating our relationship, giving thanks to God for it, as we gather in worship to celebrate our one Saviour, the risen Lord Jesus Christ, to whom the one church belongs. In a day structured as a Eucharistic (thanksgiving) service, about a thousand of us will sing together, pray together, study together, and feast together, at a shared luncheon and most especially at the Lord’s table.

The featured speaker for the day will be Dr. Sallie McFague, Distinguished Theologian in Residence at the Vancouver School of Theology. Her most recent book is Life Abundant: Rethinking Theology and Economy for a Planet in Peril. The focus for the day is water, that which gives us life both literally – no living creature on this planet can do without it – and spiritually, as water comes together with the promise of God to bring us into the church of Christ.

The Scripture readings for the day are Isaiah 55.1-11, Psalm 107.33-43,Revelation 22.1-5 and John 4.7-15. The liturgy is built from Evangelical Lutheran Worship, our new primary worship resource (along with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, or ELCA); our Anglican partners have expressed a strong desire to be introduced to that which is most important to us, the framework we use as we gather for worship Sunday by Sunday. The musician for the day is our National Convention Musician, Mark Sedio, the Music Director at Central Lutheran Church (ELCA) in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

The National Bishop, Raymond Schultz, and the Primate, Andrew Hutchison, will share in presiding, in the Thanksgiving for Baptism, that which makes us one, and in the celebration of the Meal which keeps us one. Everyone will be assigned to a table group for the day, half Anglican, half Lutheran, with other factors to keep it all interesting, and each group will spend the day together as we worship in Holy Communion, song, prayer, Scripture, study, and share food together. It promises to be a rich day of fellowship, of growing together, as we give thanks to God for our Full Communion relationship six years in, and recommit ourselves to this shared journey into which Christ has called us.

Rev. Paul Johnson
Assistant to the Bishop for Ecumenical Relations – ELCIC

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